1950s Unlimited
1950-1969 All things mid century. Check out my pages!
1950s Unlimited
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Zee Zee Martine



From Playgirl magazine 1956
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Evelyn “Treasure Chest” West



from 1956 Playgirl magazine
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Vallkyra


from Playgirl magazine 1956
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Blaze 


from Playgirl magazine 1956
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Tana Louise 
from Striparama magazine 1965
Tana Louise 
from Striparama magazine 1965
Tana Louise 
from Striparama magazine 1965
Tana Louise 
from Striparama magazine 1965
Tana Louise 
from Striparama magazine 1965
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Betty O’Ray  
(strip tease dancer and model)


from Glamour Parade magazine oct.1957
Betty O’Ray  
(strip tease dancer and model)


from Glamour Parade magazine oct.1957
Betty O’Ray  
(strip tease dancer and model)


from Glamour Parade magazine oct.1957
Betty O’Ray  
(strip tease dancer and model)


from Glamour Parade magazine oct.1957
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Floor Show


crowd pleasing Beverly Jean working the floor at the Peel Palace in Greenwich Village.   (cabaret magazine 1957)
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Jennie Lee
from Cabaret magazine 1957
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Tempest Storm’s got you in her sites
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Blaze
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NAJA KARAMURU 


Diabolique magazine c.1961-62
NAJA KARAMURU 


Diabolique magazine c.1961-62
NAJA KARAMURU 


Diabolique magazine c.1961-62
NAJA KARAMURU 


Diabolique magazine c.1961-62
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  Lily Ayers 
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Tempest Storm doing her thing
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Tinker Bell as Queen of the Nile and as herself.
Tinker Bell had a famous stage show that was claimed to be the “best in the business”. It was called the Sins of Cleopatra. As her alter ego, Queen of the Nile, she would annoint her skin with oils, writhe around to violent claps of thunder and flashes of lightning and dance with a snake.  
"strong men cringe and women shudder as the dainty hand reaches into the basket and comes out clutching a writhing snake. She watches it with fascinated eyes as it darts hither and tither, as though bewildered by the beautiful body that is only protected by a few wispy garments. Then the beady eyes focus full on the naked bosom…and the snake strikes!"
Nobody rushed on stage as the soft lights bathed her glistening body and kissed her smooth curves. There was no need to…before you could say “G-String”, the stunning charmer was back on her feet and tripping back to the ominous mummy case from which she had emerged earlier.  The audience is as silent as a tomb as it waits.”
"The real Tinker Bell emerges from the case and bounces about the stage doing take offs from famous stage personalities, singing popular songs, mimicking  hoary vaudeville performers of old, weaving and teasing in a manner delightful to behold."
from Striparama magazine 1965
Tinker Bell as Queen of the Nile and as herself.
Tinker Bell had a famous stage show that was claimed to be the “best in the business”. It was called the Sins of Cleopatra. As her alter ego, Queen of the Nile, she would annoint her skin with oils, writhe around to violent claps of thunder and flashes of lightning and dance with a snake.  
"strong men cringe and women shudder as the dainty hand reaches into the basket and comes out clutching a writhing snake. She watches it with fascinated eyes as it darts hither and tither, as though bewildered by the beautiful body that is only protected by a few wispy garments. Then the beady eyes focus full on the naked bosom…and the snake strikes!"
Nobody rushed on stage as the soft lights bathed her glistening body and kissed her smooth curves. There was no need to…before you could say “G-String”, the stunning charmer was back on her feet and tripping back to the ominous mummy case from which she had emerged earlier.  The audience is as silent as a tomb as it waits.”
"The real Tinker Bell emerges from the case and bounces about the stage doing take offs from famous stage personalities, singing popular songs, mimicking  hoary vaudeville performers of old, weaving and teasing in a manner delightful to behold."
from Striparama magazine 1965
Tinker Bell as Queen of the Nile and as herself.
Tinker Bell had a famous stage show that was claimed to be the “best in the business”. It was called the Sins of Cleopatra. As her alter ego, Queen of the Nile, she would annoint her skin with oils, writhe around to violent claps of thunder and flashes of lightning and dance with a snake.  
"strong men cringe and women shudder as the dainty hand reaches into the basket and comes out clutching a writhing snake. She watches it with fascinated eyes as it darts hither and tither, as though bewildered by the beautiful body that is only protected by a few wispy garments. Then the beady eyes focus full on the naked bosom…and the snake strikes!"
Nobody rushed on stage as the soft lights bathed her glistening body and kissed her smooth curves. There was no need to…before you could say “G-String”, the stunning charmer was back on her feet and tripping back to the ominous mummy case from which she had emerged earlier.  The audience is as silent as a tomb as it waits.”
"The real Tinker Bell emerges from the case and bounces about the stage doing take offs from famous stage personalities, singing popular songs, mimicking  hoary vaudeville performers of old, weaving and teasing in a manner delightful to behold."
from Striparama magazine 1965
Tinker Bell as Queen of the Nile and as herself.
Tinker Bell had a famous stage show that was claimed to be the “best in the business”. It was called the Sins of Cleopatra. As her alter ego, Queen of the Nile, she would annoint her skin with oils, writhe around to violent claps of thunder and flashes of lightning and dance with a snake.  
"strong men cringe and women shudder as the dainty hand reaches into the basket and comes out clutching a writhing snake. She watches it with fascinated eyes as it darts hither and tither, as though bewildered by the beautiful body that is only protected by a few wispy garments. Then the beady eyes focus full on the naked bosom…and the snake strikes!"
Nobody rushed on stage as the soft lights bathed her glistening body and kissed her smooth curves. There was no need to…before you could say “G-String”, the stunning charmer was back on her feet and tripping back to the ominous mummy case from which she had emerged earlier.  The audience is as silent as a tomb as it waits.”
"The real Tinker Bell emerges from the case and bounces about the stage doing take offs from famous stage personalities, singing popular songs, mimicking  hoary vaudeville performers of old, weaving and teasing in a manner delightful to behold."
from Striparama magazine 1965